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It is with both deep joy and deep sadness that I announce to you the publication of my father’s newest book, a novel titled BROKEN WING. This book is truly beautiful, and I only wish my father was here to hold it in his hands.

 

Set in the remote mountains to the north, BROKEN WING is an allegorical tale about a rusty blackbird with a broken wing who can’t fly and therefore is trapped in the inhospitable north country for the winter, and a man, known only as The Man Who Lives Alone in the Mountains, who lives a solitary life of nurturing attentiveness, simple kindness, and passionate emotional intensity. BROKEN WING is the story of how these two different lives come together.

 

A story of loneliness, survival, tenacity, and will, BROKEN WING is also about music and race and what it is like to be a minority in a strange place. A story of the natural world and the wonder of birds’ lives, and of one man’s deep connection to them, BROKEN WING becomes a song of praise for the cycle of the seasons and a meditation on the reality of dreams and the dreamlike quality of reality. Told with simple, dignified prose BROKEN WING takes on the timeless, mythic aura of a folktale.

 

The best way to get a copy of BROKEN WING is through your local bookseller (who can order it if they do not have it in stock). If that is not possible, below are links for purchasing it online.

 

Indiebound National (Buy Local!):

http://www.indiebound.org/book/9780996267632

 

Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/0996267638/ref=cm_sw_su_dp

 

Barnes & Noble:

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/broken-wing-david-budbill/1123658430?ean=9780996267632

 

FOR BOOKSELLERS & LIBRARIANS:

http://www.midpointtrade.com/book_detail.php?book_id=142945

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Selected Stories

by

Rowland E. Robinson

Edited

by

David Budbill

with an Introduction by

Hayden Carruth

* * *

University Press of New England

A Hardscrabble Classic

1995

5.5 x 8.5, 256 pages

hardbound

ISBN: 0-87451-718-4

University Press of New England/Hardscrabble Books:

http://www.dartmouth.edu/acad-inst/upne/hs1.html

* * *

From their initial publication in 1887 until fading from the popular consciousness in the 1930s, Rowland Robinson’s enormously popular stories were a staple of Vermont households and classrooms. His tales were treasured as honest and accurate portraits of the life, times and speech of pre-Civil War Vermont. In recent years Robinson has been an inspiration to writers such as Hayden Carruth, David Budbill, Howard Frank Mosher and Annie Proulx.

 

This Hardscrabble edition of DANVIS TALES presents the best of Robinson’s original six volumes and reestablishes Rowland Robinson (1833 -1900) as a serious and thoughtful, funny and loving chronicler of people’s lives and the natural world.

 

DANVIS TALES creates an engaging story of intertwined lives. There’s Sam Lovel who would rather be in the woods hunting fox than tending to the farm, and whose wild wanderings are only slightly domesticated by Hudlah Purrington the woman he woos and marries. There is Uncle Lisha Peggs, the sometime cobbler, whose shop is the stage for serious story telling. There is Pelatiah Gove, who, jilted in love, turns to rum, but is saved from a life of alcoholism through the tough and loving care of Uncle Lisha. And there is the outrageous and wonderful French-Canadian butcher of the English language, Antoine Bassette, the biggest and best liar in a pack of liars.

 

The people of Danvis are inextricably bound to the natural world. In their often thoughtless and sometimes wanton misuse of nature they give us a paradigm for ourselves. Robinson, one of America’s first conservationists, saw clearly the coming ecological crisis and warned that “He who loses all love for our common mother is, indeed, a wretched being, poorer than the beasts.”

 

With graceful and melodic prose, and an ability to write about the natural world with unsurpassed precision and detail, Rowland Robinson fashions an elegiac tribute to a complex and real people and a beautiful and threatened landscape.


 

Robinson, a well-loved voice of 19th-Century Vermont, is rescued here from obscurity by poet/playwright Budbill in this intriguing collection. . . .

 

Kirkus Reviews


 

David Budbill’s thoughtfully and meticulously edited collection of Robinson’s work . . . conveys the rhapsodic poetry of his nature writing, his uncanny ear for the way people truly spoke along the spine of the Green Mountains, and the unfailing love Robinson felt for the rapidly disappearing Vermont wilderness.

 

Chris Bohjalian

Vermont Life Magazine


 

[Robinson’s] contribution . . . is crucial to us, because it tells us what we as Americans and New Englanders are: our character, our heritage, our predicament.

from the Introduction by Hayden Carruth


This fascinating volume is long overdue. David Budbill’s careful editing and insightful introduction brings the core of Robinson’s best writing back to us in an intelligent, manageable edition. Hayden Carruth’s brilliant essay places Robinson in his 19th century context and points out his literary significance, as well as his links to Artemus Ward, Mark Twain, and –stunning insight–Thomas Hardy!

Thomas Slayton, Editor, Vermont Life


 

 

I find [Robinson] more exciting than Thoreau, and in reproduction of dialect more adroit than Thomas hardy . . . . If a great many of us hadn’t been literary snobs for the past 50 years, we would have canonized this simple man many moons ago.

John Farrar, late of Farrar, Straus and Giroux, writing in 1934


 

 

Documents, with keenness, subtlety, and compassion, the lifestyles and people who lived and worked in Vermont. His evocative descriptions of nature are balanced by a rollicking, heavily apostrophized dialect that captures the quirky nature of New England speech and the characters who mouth it.

Seven Days


 

There is a unique joy in championing the rediscovery of a forgotten writer. It is with great pleasure and enthusiasm that I welcome you to Danvis and to the lives of the people in this particular place on the western slopes of the Green Mountains and down into the broad valley that stretches to he shores of Lake Champlain, this particular place fully real yet also fully within the imagination of Rowland E. Robinson.

from the Editor’s Preface by David Budbill

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by

Mildred Walker

With an Introduction

by

David Budbill

 

 

* * *

Bison Books

University of Nebraska Press

1996

5.25 x 8, 269 pages

paperback

ISBN: 0-8032-9782-3

University of Nebraska Press

http://nebraskapress.unl.edu/searchmain.html

search: “walker”

* * *

Dr. Norton’s Wife was praised for its quiet honesty and artistic integrity when it was first published in 1938. It stands up firmly as a portrait of a marriage subjected to the strain of unexpected invalidism. As a doctor’s wife, Sue Norton is no stranger to matters of life and death. But medical shoptalk screens her from the realities of illness until she is diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. Never clinical, Walker, herself the wife of a doctor, accurately describes the disease’s progress and the adjustments necessary to cope with it. The result is a tender story of “the marriage of true minds.”


 

 

An honest, straightforward little novel. . . . The author has a precise feeling for the atmosphere, the personalities, and the intrigues of a small medical college.”

The New Yorker


 

[A] disturbing book. . . . For those who are interested in the world of unuttered thoughts, Dr. Norton’s Wife will prove an absorbing study.

 

The New York Times.

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by

Mildred Walker

With an Introduction

by

David Budbill

 

* * *

Bison Books

University of Nebraska Press

1996

5.25 x 8, 441 pages

paperback

ISBN: 0-8032-9786-6

University of Nebraska Press

http://nebraskapress.unl.edu/searchmain.html

search: “walker”

* * *

 

Little Sara Bolster loved the great shining horses that drew the Henkel brewery wagon through the streets of Detroit in the 1880s. Those horses came to signify her fate, for she married the Henkel son and later, as a widow, took over the business. Sara’s struggle against the intolerance and hypocrisy of family and friends who disapproved of a woman running a brewery and opening a beer garden makes her a standout among the characters of Mildred Walker. The Brewers’ Big Horses recreates the manners and traditions of Germans in America as Prohibition gets up steam. Mildred Walker, chronicler of the modern American West and New England, is gaining new admirers with Bison Books reprints of such novels as Winter Wheat and The Southwest Corner.


 

 

[The Brewers’ Big Horses] has suspense and gripping interest. . . . The story is told quietly, with balance and realism and with the subtlety which is itself the effortless effect of restraint. The characters are drawn with few strokes, but increasingly they take on intimacy as well as significance in the reader’s mind. . . . Mildred Walker has drawn upon assimilated knowledge and searching individual thought, and the story has substance and vitality, convincing and unstrained.

 

The New York Times

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* * *
 

 

Now distributed by:Bondcliff Books
P.O. Box 385
Littleton, NH 03561

1-800-859-7581
or
603-444-4880

Email:

info@bondcliffbooks.com

or

dickerman2@myfairpoint.net

Hardcover ISBN 0-9657144-6-2 $15.99

Paperback ISBN 0-9657144-7-0 $5.99

with a new Afterword by the author

 

* * *
 

Seth and Daniel have ventured into the woods and swamps on their hikes and camping trips, but they’ve never climbed Black Spruce mountain. Perhaps the legend of the mistreated foster child who ran away to hide there has stopped them: according to the story, his bones still lie in a cave on the mountaintop.

Now, as summer ends, the boys feel ready for the lonely mountain’s challenge. But neither realizes what special significance the fate of the dead boy has for Daniel, until their simple camping trip becomes a journey into a painful past that must be confronted.

In a powerful, strikingly original book, David Budbill writes about the natural world, about loneliness, love and the need to reach out to others.

 

* * *
 

 

BONES ON BLACK SPRUCE MOUNTAIN

  • won The 1979-80 Dorothy Canfield Fisher Award
  • has been featured on Vermont Public Radio’s Camel’s Hump Radio

 

* * *
 

A thoroughly convincing wilderness yarn that effectively fuses the quest for mastery with the quest for knowledge.

The New York Times Book Review

 

The Bones on Black Spruce Mountain is one of those books kids and adults alike will want to read over, and over, and over. Far as I’m concerned, same goes for anything Budbill has written.

Rusty DeWees, actor, writer and a.k.a. “The Logger”

 

A taut adventure story enhanced by authentic detail of natural wonders, including the human psyche.

Publishers’ Weekly

 

Budbill’s exploration of a friendship is thoughtful and haunting…delicate and strong.

Booklist

 

Condensed prose…great skill and sensitivity…an unusally good, satisfying book.

Children’s Book Review Service

 

* * *
 

 

Hardcover ISBN 0-9657144-6-2 $15.99
Paperback ISBN 0-9657144-7-0 $5.99to order contact:

Bondcliff Books
PO Box 385
Littleton, NH 03561

1-800-859-7581
or
603-444-4880

Email:  info@bondcliffbooks.com

or

dickerman2@myfairpoint.net

 

* * *
 

BONES ON BLACK SPRUCE MOUNTAIN
was first published by The Dial Press, New York, 1978

subsequently in paperback

by Bantam/Skylark Editions

and then

Puffin Books

 

 

* * *

Over 150,000 copies sold

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