* * * * *

THE WAR IN IRAQ

* * * * *

 

In This Issue:

 

  • David’s Notes: What You Can Do
  • Shell Game
  • Recommended Reading
  • The Flag of Human Suffering
  • A New Book on the Working Poor

* * * * *
 

DAVID’S NOTES

WHAT YOU CAN DO

As folks who, more than forty years ago, pounded the streets to campaign for civil rights and to protest the Vietnam war, it’s been difficult to get used to the new cyber-protests, but we’ve got to admit these new forms are having their effect. And this is not the time to let up or relax. Now is the time for even more pressure on those in Washington, DC. This week, October 7-13, is a critical week for the anti-war movement. The more you can do this week the better.

Although emails are easy and cheap, we think phone calls are more much more effective. Snailmail takes weeks to be processed into Congressional offices, and email can be overwhelming. When you place a phone call you can talk to another human being. He/she can hear the emotion in your voice. And your opinion doesn’t pile up in an In-Box.

FOUR THINGS YOU CAN DO:

1. Call your congressional delegation and register your strong opposition to giving President Bush carte blanche to do whatever he wants to do wherever and whenever he wants to do it. Speak out against the war in Iraq. If you don’t have phone numbers for your senators and congressmen they are available at: http://www.visi.com/juan/congress

2. Call the White House opinion line and register your strong opposition to the war in Iraq. Call (202) 456-1111, Monday through Friday between 9:00 and 5:00 Eastern Standard Time. This only takes a minute, and a real person answers the phone and asks whether you’re “for” or “against” the war, and what state you’re from. If you have done this before, do it again. They do not ask you for your name or address, only what state you are calling from. Call the White House every day this week.

3. Display your opposition to war with peace flags, U.N. flags, Earth flags, anti-war posters, etc.

4. Pass this edition of THE JUDEVINE MOUNTAIN EMAILITE along to your contacts.


* * * * *
 

SHELL GAME
by
David Budbill

 

A year after 9/11, it is clear that George Bush and his administration are using the so-called War on Terror as an excuse to advance their dreams of unilateral domination abroad and their Right Wing agenda at home. The sooner we can be rid of This Disaster and his administration the better off we all will be.

Before 9/11 the Bush Administration established an arrogant, go-it-alone attitude toward the world community with acts such as withdrawing from the Kyoto Treaty for climate change. Then, after a brief post-9/11 sojourn into talk of coalitions and allies, Bush & Co. returned almost immediately to its myopic, unilateral way of approaching all issues. They thumbed their noses at Russia and withdrew from the ABM treaty; they refused to sign on to the International Court of Justice and demanded exemption from it; they withheld our contribution to funding for the United Nations Population Fund, to name only three in a depressingly long list of examples of ways in which the Bush administration is an international bully.

And the president’s abysmal failure of leadership in the Middle East, his embarrassingly pro-Israel stand, and his increasingly bellicose rhetoric about invading Iraq have not only alienated and infuriated moderate Muslims everywhere, they have also alienated and infuriated and frightened our former friends around the world.

And here at home Bush & Co. seem determined to alienate everyone but the most conservative. John Ashcroft invents TIPS–the Terrorism, Information and Protection System–so that we can spy on each other in the name of security. It sounds like the McCarthy Era or Communist Russia or Maoist China. The same man who invented TIPS also spent thousands of dollars to cover up the bare breasts of The Spirit of Justice. A year ago we were attacked by religious fanatics from far away; now our civil rights and our own spirit of justice are attacked by a religious fanatic here at home.

George Bush & Co. have found that The War on Terror is a handy tool for doing what they wanted to do anyway: gut environmental legislation and regulations, give more tax breaks to the rich, cut support for the young, the old and the poor. The list is endless.

Yet the American people are silent. Why?

Is it because Americans are brow-beaten and bamboozled by the shenanigans of the last Presidential election–an election that was “won” with illegal and racist tactics in a state where the president’s brother is the governor?

Is it because Americans know that “our” president was not elected but appointed by the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court?

Is it because Americans are incredulous at the Bush administration’s self-righteous, moralistic bombast about business ethics while criminal CEO’s run the White House?

Is it because Americans are genuinely threatened by and afraid of future terrorist attacks? We want wise, far sighted leadership in the White House, not self-serving megalomaniacs.

Is it because Americans are frustrated and angry, because an unelected President declared a war that is not a war? We haven’t smoked Osama bin Laden out of any hole. In fact nothing has happened except we’ve got a huge, new deficit, the stock market has fallen apart and the President has proposed a military budget larger than all the rest of the world’s military budgets combined.

And for what? So we can fight Rogue States? Some wacko Axis of Evil?

The plague of Pax Americana is upon the world. And it is upon us also. We–you and I and our country–we are the Rogue State. As Pogo said once, “We have met the enemy and he is us.” Yet as a nation, it’s as if we are hypnotized by a bunch of fast talking street corner con-men and shills eager to sell us a bill of goods we know we shouldn’t buy.

When are Americans going to wake up and realize that this so-called War on Terror is a sham, a scam, a shell game played on a cardboard box on the nation’s street corner? On September 11, 2002, it is clear that George Bush has found a way with his War on Terror to keep the American public from speaking out about and rebelling against the insane travesty of justice and governance that is now transpiring in our nation’s capitol.

EDITOR’S NOTE: This essay first appeared in a slightly different version in THE RUTLAND (VT) HERALD and THE BARRE (VT) TIMES ARGUS on September 11, 2002. The essay was originally commissioned by THE BURLINGTON (VT) FREE PRESS, but was rejected for being “too partisan.”


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RECOMMENDED READING

Out of the mountain of material to read out there on the web and in newspapers, we want to recommend just three items:

1. From THE ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION, Jay Bookman’s piece, THE PRESIDENT’S REAL GOAL IN IRAQ, the one piece out there that, in our opinion, explains clearly why Bush wants so badly to start a war. The war in Iraq is not about Saddam Hussein or terrorism or that ubiquitous phrase, “weapons of mass destruction.” It’s about unilateral and absolute world domination. It’s about a Pax Americana. And it’s about, once and for all, the destruction the United Nations. All this has been a part of the Right Wing’s master plan, according to Jay Bookman, since at least 1992. And now that the Radical Right’s cabal is in the White House, they can act on their long standing desires.

For the details go to: http://www.accessatlanta.com/ajc/opinion/bookman

2. We also recommend Ramsey Clark’s LETTER TO THE U.N.: DO NOT SUPPORT ATTACK ON IRAQ. This letter by former U.S. Attorney General Ramsey Clark was sent to all members of the UN Security Council, with copies to the UN General Assembly on September 20, 2002.

To read the letter go to: http://www.iacenter.org/rc_letter0902.htm

3. Finally, we recommend, WAR ON IRAQ: WHAT TEAM BUSH DOESN’T WANT YOU TO KNOW by William Rivers Pitt with Scott Ritter, former U.N. weapons inspector.

Author William Rivers Pitt talks to former U.N. weapons inspector Scott Ritter (a self-described conservative Republican) who debunks the key arguments for war on Iraq. The book closes with a stark forecast for American troops if a ground war ensues and urges the nationÕs leaders to seek a diplomatic solution before it is too late.

Order WAR ON IRAQ from your local bookseller. It should be in stores this week. Or go to Amazon.com to:http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1893956385/qid=1033827674/sr=2-1/ref=sr_2_1/103-4259589-8100656 or to: http://www.war-on-iraq.com. Scroll to the bottom of the page to order. Good discounts to individuals ordering multiple copies.


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THE FLAG OF HUMAN SUFFERING
by
David Budbill

 

The most striking image for me in all the hours of television I watched on September 11, 2001, was the picture of a man and a woman, both African Americans, both dressed in business suits, both completely covered in gray ash, both fleeing hand in hand, their mouths open in gasping Os. Their ashen faces and bodies, their postures of woundedness, grief and confusion made me think of images I’ve seen of people in Hiroshima and Nagasaki in the moments and days after we dropped atomic bombs on those cities.

A lot of people said right after 9/11 that the American age of innocence was over. To cite just one example, shortly after 1:30 in the afternoon on Sunday, September 16th, Mara Liasson on National Public Radio said, “A certain amount of our innocence is gone.” She gave voice to a common misunderstanding. We as a nation have never been innocent. What is over is not our innocence. What is over is the American age of impunity. Now and into the future we will get to suffer as the rest of the world has suffered.

Seeing those two people staggering through the rubble of the World Trade Center and thinking about Hiroshima and Nagasaki, made me think about the saturation bombing and the napalm we loosed on Vietnam and that made me think about the TV pictures of our relentless bombing of Baghdad, you remember those squeaky clean images of our “smart” bombs falling all over Baghdad, you remember how we sat at home and watched on our TVs as Generals Powell and Schwartzkoff explained to us the technical details of our devastation of Iraq.

What unites all of these images of human suffering, these acts of carnage and devastation, from Nagasaki to Baghdad, until September 11th, is how all of them were so far away, just pictures to us, just TV images to be analyzed and watched with a cool and pristine fascination. Not anymore.

My daughter stood on the Brooklyn shore of the East River and watched tens of thousands of ash covered New Yorkers stream across the Brooklyn Bridge as if they were refugees, this timeless image from Germany, Japan, Vietnam, China, Iraq, Bosnia, Ethiopia, Rwanda, this image of dazed and confused refugees fleeing–this image that came home to New York.

In the year since 9/11 I had hoped we might put away the American flags, and raise instead the flag of human suffering. I had hoped we could attend to the pain and grief of human suffering–no matter where it presented itself, whether it is the stockbroker who died in the rubble of the World Trade Center or the janitor in the stockbroker’s office or the fireman who died trying to save them both or the suffering people of Iraq who now live in daily panic at what we may, any day, do to them.

EDITOR’S NOTE: This essay first appeared in THE BURLINGTON (VT) FREE PRESS on September 13, 2002


* * * * *
 

A NEW BOOK
ON THE WORKING POOR
 

Bottom Dog Press, an outfit created specifically to publish writing about and by the working class, has just published a book called WORKING HARD FOR THE MONEY: AMERICA’S WORKING POOR: In Stories, Poems, and Photos, edited by Mary E. Weems and Larry Smith.

A gripping introduction by Mary Weems and Larry Smith pulls the reader into a plethora of wide ranging stories, poems and photographs about being poor and working hard in America. The contributors are from and write about all the geographic regions of the United States, urban and rural, black, white, Latino, Asian, Native American.

This is a fine anthology full of good writing by writers you’ve probably never heard of. Very Highly Recommended.

You may order copies at $12.95 each, plus 1.50 postage (a total of $14.45):
ISBN 0-933087-77-2
from:

BOTTOM DOG PRESS
c/o Firelands College
P.O. Box 425
Huron, Ohio 44839
or from Larry Smith at lsmithdog@aol.com
or by phone at: (419) 433-5560

Top

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* * * * *
CHRISTIANITY, TERRORISM AND THE CYCLE OF WAR

 

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In This Issue:

 

  • David’s Notes: Christians and the War on Terror
  • Three Recommendations: 
    James Wagner. Com
    Alternatives To War. Org
    Peace Links
  • Lessons from the Mideast Agony by Daniel Maguire
  • Pearl Buck and the Cycle of War by Lois Eby

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DAVID’S NOTES

 

CHRISTIANS AND THE WAR ON TERROR

 

I come from deep deep in the Methodist church in Ohio. My mother’s parents were Methodist missionaries in Africa at the end of the 19th Century and upon returning to America, my grandfather continued as a pastor to local Methodist churches in Ohio for the rest of his life.

When I was a child, every morning at breakfast we read THE UPPER ROOM and the assigned Bible passages in both the Old and the New Testament. I went to church every Sunday for at least half the day and often spent one evening a week there too. When I was in high school I was president of the Methodist Youth Fellowship at my church, and I went to church camp every summer. I went to a small Christian college in southeastern Ohio and upon graduating I entered Union Theological Seminary in New York City.

When I was a student at Union Seminary in New York in the early 1960s, I had to take a church history course. Our text was called THE HISTORY OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH, a huge tome, which I retitled THE CRIMES AGAINST HUMANITY IN THE NAME OF JESUS CHRIST. What I learned from that course is that the carnage wreaked upon the world by the Christian Church down through the ages makes the Taliban look like bad guys from a skit on Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood.

There’s a strong desire in the United States these days to return to those golden days of yesteryear and mount again a Holy Crusade against the heathen infidel, a desire to return to the idea that if conversion of the heathen by introduction to The Book–The Bible–doesn’t do the trick, then conversion by the sword is not only necessary but sanctified and Godly.

Thus in the middle east during the Crusades as also in South America, Africa and myriad other places around the world during the age of colonialism, the recalcitrant non-Christian heathen was converted to The One True Faith by the sword.

Here at the beginning of the 21st Century it’s not so much The Bible that is “The Book” as it is the book of Capitalist Materialism and today the sword is not literally a sword, but rather more likely a laser guided bomb delivered from a plane so high up in the sky it is invisible. These differences not withstanding, a new Crusade has begun.

Whether it is in Afghanistan, Iraq, Iran, Venezuela, North Korea, The Philippines, Georgia, Palestine, Cuba, Libya, Syria or WhoKnowsWhereElse–the list of those included in The Axis of Evil gets longer every day–it is clear that this new Crusade, this Pax Americana, with which we now attempt to blanket the entire world, is a Holy War.

And those waging this Holy War are playing God. There is some kind of bitter irony in that, because these so-called Christians in the current administration, like President Bush and Attorney General Ashcroft to name just two, deliberately misunderstand the holy writ to which they constantly refer. Just two examples:

Many people who have not studied the Bible don’t understand the meaning of the well known notion in Hebrew law, of “an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth.” To many modern people who did not grow up with the Bible this seems like some kind of barbarism when just the opposite is true. The Hebrews came up with the idea of “an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth” as a method, a law, of restraint, the point being that if your enemy puts out your eye, you may not do anything more to him than put out his eye. Imagine what it would be like if this ancient Hebrew law were applied to the current Israel-Palestine situation?

And the same is true for Yahweh’s edict which says, “Vengeance is mine sayeth the Lord” meaning again that it is for the Lord to seek vengeance, not those who have been offended.

Jesus of Nazareth, that upstart revisionist, came along and played some major changes on these ancient Hebraic tunes, but the ideas grow directly out of his Jewishness and the power of law to create restraint. As Daniel Maguire points out in a letter quoted later in this issue, it was Ancient Israel’s gift to the world to create the revolutionary idea that it is law and justice, not military might, that brings peace.

In a time of bitter slaughter and seemingly hopeless quagmires out of which it surely seems impossible to get, I want to conclude by quoting the last few lines of Chapter 80 of Lao Tzu’s Tao Teh Ching. Here is a vision of peace we must cling to. Ridiculous and impossible as such a notion seems these days, it is necessary, mandatory, that we keep this vision before us so that we will not give in completely to the forces of cynicism and war.

Here are the last few lines of Chapter 80:

Their food is plain and good, and they enjoy eating it.
Their clothes are simple and beautiful.
Their homes secure.
They are happy in their ways.
Though they live within sight of their neighbors,
and their chickens and dogs call back and forth,
they leave each other in peace as they all grow old and die.

Imagine a world in which different groups of people live within sight of each other, so close that their chickens and dogs call back and forth, and yet the people all live in peace with each other as they all grow old and die. Imagine that.


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THREE RECOMMENDATIONS:

JAMES WAGNER. COM
In recent months, New Yorker James Wagner has developed one of the most interesting and readable websites out there. Wagner has a wide-ranging concern for current events such as the War in Iraq, John Ashcroft’s shenanigans and other DC outrages, Gay Rights, the less commercial arts and even the lighter side of What’s Happenin’ in the Baghdad on the Hudson. We strongly recommend you visit: http://www.jameswagner.com

 

ALTERNATIVES TO WAR
Coming out of upstate New York is an interesting website called: ALTERNATIVES TO WAR. Full of contact organizations, relevant quotations, ideas and recommendations for ways to resolve conflicts without resorting to war, this is a fine organization and a useful website. Visit: http://www.alternativestowar.org

PEACE LINKS
Alternatives to War also publishes an twice-monthly, on-line newsletter called: PEACE LINKS, which is available to anyone who signs up, which you can do athttp://www.alternativestowar.org


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LESSONS FROM THE MIDEAST AGONY

To the Editor of THE NEW YORK TIMES:
Re “15 Killed by Suicide Bomber; Sharon Cuts Short U.S. Visit After a Meeting With Bush” (front page, May 8):

Voices from Israel’s past contain a wisdom that is not reflected in the peace-through-war policies of Prime Minister Ariel Sharon’s government.

Some 30 years ago, a Hebrew University law faculty member wrote, “A border is secure when those living on the other side do not have sufficient motivation to infringe on it.”

As another Hebrew University professor put it: After every victory, “the abyss of mutual hatred will deepen and the desires for vengeance will mount.”

A few months after the 1967 war, Yeshayahu Leibowitz, a leading Israeli intellectual, said that the occupation was unjust and would lead to the subjugation of the Palestinians, and even to the corruption of Israeli society.

Ancient Israel gifted the world with the revolutionary idea that it is justice, not military might, that brings peace. Now is the hour for that wisdom to be reborn.

DANIEL C. MAGUIRE
Milwaukee, May 8, 2002
The writer is a professor of religious ethics at Marquette University.


* * * * *
PEARL BUCK AND THE CYCLE OF WAR
by
Lois Eby

Many years ago I read Pearl Buck’s autobiography called MY SEVERAL WORLDS. In it there’s a description of the attitude ordinary Chinese had toward armies and war, at a time when warlords fought back and forth across the landscape of China. Buck wrote that they spoke of war as a natural disaster. She inspired me to think of war as if it were a hurricane, a disaster that local communities can only pray does not blow their way.

It’s a metaphor that has seemed even more compelling since September 11th and the aftermath of violence and retaliation around the world since then. The aggressive side of human nature continues to carry the destructive force of hurricanes, floods, and volcanoes. Communities continue to hope that the disaster does not blow their way.

Pearl Buck also wrote eloquently about observing seeds of violence in the relationship between the colonial West and the Chinese people. As a child, she was accepted in Chinese homes. She became especially sensitive to the negative effect that colonialism and its aggressive policies had on Chinese attitudes toward white people and the West. After the Western powers defeated the Chinese in the Boxer Rebellion of 1900, she saw how the Chinese hated and feared white people, feelings they hid from white adults but not from her. She says, “I learned the other side of the victory the white men had won and I knew then what my life has taught me since, that in any war a victory means another war, and yet another, until some day inevitably the tides turn, and the victor is the vanquished, and the circle reverses itself, but remains nevertheless a circle.”

Pearl Buck’s dual images have been very much on my mind lately. The image of war as an endless circle of battles, defeat, humiliation, and still more battles certainly fits the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. And it seems to me that her image of war as a natural disaster like a hurricane, blowing first one way and then another, serves as a warning about the potential consequences of a never ending cycle of terrorism and anti-terrorist wars. The wish to avoid planting the seeds of future hurricanes gives us an urgent reason to question whether war will ever bring an effective end to terrorism. Unlike facing an impending hurricane, we do have the opportunity to step back, assess the consequences, and seek ways to break the cycle, rather than take at face value assurances that some day war will eliminate our enemies.

EDITOR’S NOTE: This essay first aired as a commentary on Vermont Public Radio on 29 April 2002

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* * * * *GET UP STAND UP

SPEAK OUT SPEAK UP

IMPEACH GEORGE W. BUSH

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In This Issue:

  • David’s Notes: 
  • American Dreamin’ 
  • Impeach George W. Bush 
  • Untitled 
  • Getting the News
    BBC, CBC, Short Wave, Manchester Guardian
    Anarkiss NewsWire
    Toward Freedom
    Satire for Survival at Satire Wire
     
  • What Mr. Marley Said
  • * * * * *

    DAVID’S NOTES:

     

    DAVID’S NOTES

     

     

    A few people have written asking why it’s been so long since the last Judevine Mountain Emailite–#23, the 911 issue, came out on 9 October 2001. I’ve been wondering that myself. I’ve been working, or trying to work, on this issue since the first of the year, but I just couldn’t seem to get it done.

     

    Then a friend of ours wrote recently saying, “I have been running scared for the last couple of months–burnt out from all the reading and posting; horrified at the mounting evidence of intersecting ulterior motives in every institution from government to private enterprise; feeling powerless in the face of the massive beast slouching toward us all.” I think that’s right. Many of us are, at least I know I have been and still am, in some way traumatized by all that’s happened since 911.

     

    Just a little more than a year ago the Bush juggernaut stole an election. Then his pals on the Supreme Court installed him as President of the United States. And less than a year later, in spite of Enron, Bush’s own jingoistic and insane rhetoric, a collapsing economy, and actual warfare, he is the most popular President in the history of the country.

     

    A lot of us have been stuck in a malaise of dolor and inaction brought on by how depressing the past year’s events have been. Yet we all know that depression and upset does not take the place of action. As Edward Abbey said, “Sentiment without action is the ruin of the soul.”

     

    It’s time to start to fight. The question remains: How? What to do? Each of us will answer these questions for ourselves in various ways. Each of us will find our own time and place and method of action. What’s certain is: we need to get going.

     

    This sentiment is growing more popular the further away we get from 911 and the more we see the disastrous effects of the Bush administration’s decisions. Robert Kuttner had an especially good article in the Boston Globe recently. It’s called “Bush Blunder Shows It’s Time for Dissent.” To get the complete article email Anarkiss NewsWire at: anarkiss@mindspring.com. Ask for it by title and give the date: 2/13/02 .

     

    This issue of The Judevine Mountain Emailite then seeks to contribute something to the growing need for action and protest in the face of overwhelming silence and inaction.

     

    This issue is also a family affair, being as it offers two poems by The Editor’s daughter, Nadine Wolf Budbill. The nepotistic, good old boy network of Bush-Cheney-Rehnquist-et.al. got nothin’ on us!


    * * * * *

    AMERICAN DREAMIN’

     

    THE DREAM:

     

    I PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE TO THE FLAG
    OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
    AND TO THE REPUBLIC
    FOR WHICH IT STANDS
    ONE NATION
    UNDER GOD
    INDIVISIBLE
    WITH LIBERTY AND JUSTICE FOR ALL

     

    IN MY SLEEP I AM HAUNTED BY
    THE SEPTEMBER SCHOOL DAY WHEN
    ALL YOUNG PEOPLE STOOD AND RECITED
    THESE WORDS IN
    SYNCHRONIZED UNISON
    EAST COAST TO WEST COAST
    ORCHESTRATED
    ACROSS TIME ZONES

     

    THE DREAM HAS BECOME A NIGHTMARE
    HAS BECOME THE ILLUSION, THE DELUSION
    AND WE BELIEVE IT
    WE BELIEVE IT?

     

    IF ON THAT SEPTEMBER SCHOOL DAY YOU
    WERE JUST A LITTLE BIT
    REBELLIOUS
    REFUSED TO STAND
    ‘CAUSE YOU’D ALREADY HAD THE NIGHTMARE
    NO LONGER BELIEVE THE DREAM
    YOU GOT SLAMMED INTO A LOCKER IN THE HALL
    CALLED A TERRORIST / A-RAB-LOVING / FAGGOT
    ‘CAUSE YOU’RE EITHER WITH US OR AGAINST US
    YOU’RE EITHER WITH US OR AGAINST US
    GOT IT KID?
    YOU’RE EITHER WITH US OR AGAINST US
    AND THAT DON’T LEAVE NO ROOM FOR
    QUESTIONING
    AND THAT DON’T LEAVE NO ROOM FOR…

     

    I PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE 
    SWALLOWED IT WHOLE AND SPIT IT BACK UP ON DEMAND
    RIGHT HAND ACROSS MY HEART AS I STAND
    JUST WORDS FALLIN’ OUT MY MOUTH, JUST WORDS, JUST WORDS YA’LL

     

    TO THE FLAG
    RED WHITE AND BLUE
    AND IN 1492
    COLUMBUS SAILED THE OCEAN
    OH SHIT, MY PAPER ON BETSY ROSS IS OVERDUE
    THE ONLY WOMAN IN MY HISTORY BOOK
    MADE HER MARK ‘CAUSE
    DAMN SHE COULD SEW

     

    OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
    TO THE REPUBLIC
    FOR WHICH IT STANDS
    ONE NATION

    WAIT, I HEARD ONCE ABOUT THE CHEROKEE NATION
    SIOUX NATION, IROQUOIS NATION AND I’M FAILIN’ MATH
    BUT I’M PRETTY SURE THAT ADDS UP TO MORE THAN ONE

     

    UNDER GOD
    WHO WEARS A WHITE MAN’S FACE
    NOT GODDESS, NOT ALLAH, NOT JAH, NOT YEMENJA

     

    INDIVISIBLE
    PREFIX I-N MEANIN’ NOT / DIVISIBLE MEANIN’ DIVIDABLE / MEANIN’ NOT DIVIDED / BUT THE BLACK KIDS AND THE WHITE KIDS AND THE ASIAN KIDS SIT AT DIFFERENT TABLES IN THE CAFETERIA AND THE WHITE KIDS GET BUSED IN FROM ACROSS TOWN WHERE THEY LIVE IN HOUSES NOT PROJECTS AND THERE’S LESS TRASH ON THE STREET AND NO TOXIC WASTE DUMP HIDDEN BENEATH THE CONCRETE

     

    WITH LIBERTY AND JUSTICE FOR ALL
    BUT I DON’T FEEL SAFE WALKIN’ HOME ALONE LATE AT NIGHT
    BUT MY COUSIN’S IN JAIL ‘CAUSE
    HE WAS AT THE WRONG PLACE AT THE WRONG TIME
    DRESSED TOO COMFORTABLY IN HIS BROWN SKIN
    BUT MY UNCLE RAPED ME WHEN I WAS 10
    PAID FOR A GOOD LAWYER AND THEN
    DID IT AGAIN

     

    WITH LIBERTY AND JUSTICE
    WITH LIBERTY AND JUSTICE
    WITH LIBERTY AND JUSTICE
    FOR THOSE
    WHO CAN AFFORD IT

     

    THE DREAM HAS BECOME A NIGHTMARE
    THE BOOGIE MAN IS REAL
    THE MONSTERS AREN’T JUST UNDER THE BED
    THE DREAM HAS BECOME A NIGHTMARE
    HAS BECOME THE ILLUSION, THE DELUSION
    I AM HAUNTED BY THAT SEPTEMBER SCHOOL DAY
    SYNCHRONIZED RECITATION ACROSS TIME ZONES
    MY NIGHTMARES DILATE WITH IMAGES OF
    YOUNG PEOPLE
    THEIR RIGHT HANDS ACROSS THEIR CHESTS
    STANDING BESIDE THEIR DESKS
    IN CLASSROOMS WITHOUT BOOKS
    IN CLASSROOMS WITHOUT WINDOWS
    IN CLASSROOMS WITHOUT CRAYONS
    IN CLASSROOMS WITH TOO MANY KIDS
    WITH TOO MANY POOR AND BROWN FACES

     

    AND I AM HAUNTED BY THAT SEPTEMBER SCHOOL DAY
    SYNCHRONIZED RECITATION ACROSS TIME ZONES
    MY NIGHTMARES DILATE WITH IMAGES OF
    YOUNG PEOPLE

     

    THEIR RIGHT HANDS ACROSS THEIR CHESTS
    STANDING BESIDE THEIR DESKS
    IN CLASSROOMS LINED WITH I-MACS
    IN CLASSROOMS FILLED WITH
    NEW BOOKS, GLU STICKS, AND CONSTRUCTION PAPER
    IN CLASSROOMS WHERE EDUCATION PER PUPIL HAS
    AN ANNUAL PRICE TAG OVER 30 G’S
    IN CLASSROOMS WHERE WHITE SUZY AND WHITE JOHNNY
    JUST GOT BACK FROM VENICE, ST. THOMAS, OR HAWAII
    MY COUNTRY TIS OF THEE
    SWEET LAND OF LIBERTY

     

    THE WRITING ISN’T ON THE WALL
    ‘CAUSE WE’VE MEMORIZED IT ALL
    SWALLOWED IT WHOLE
    SPIT IT BACK UP ON DEMAND
    RIGHT HAND
    ACROSS YOUR HEART AS YOU STAND
    WORDS FALLIN’ OUT YOUR MOUTH
    JUST WORDS
    THEY’RE JUST WORDS YA’LL
    THEY’RE JUST WORDS

     

    Nadine Wolf Budbill wordfierce@onebox.com

     

    EDITOR’S NOTE: Nadine is a social justice educator and poet/performer who lives in Brooklyn, NY. She can be contacted at the email address above.


     

     

    * * * * *

     

    IMPEACH GEORGE W. BUSH

    Nothing has Changed
    In the days following 911 everyone said how our lives had been permanently, irrevocably changed. It became a mantra. I said it too. I even wrote an essay called “The End to the Age of Impunity”–see JME #23–in which I argued that America as the nation that acts anytime anywhere with absolute impunity and disregard for other nations was over.

     

    Everybody was wrong. And I was the wrongest of all. Nothing has changed. In fact we as a nation now act with greater impunity than we ever have. And from all indications, if George Bush and his party and the American people who support them get their way, we have only just begun.

     

    The plague of Pax Americana is upon us.

     

    Impeach George W. Bush
    Because of what George Bush and his administration have done since 911, we are guaranteed to have terrorists after us for generations to come, an economy hopelessly in debt for military spending and basic individual rights here at home infringed upon in ways not seen since the 1950s. Bush, Rumsfeld and Ashcroft are the real Axis of Evil. And all of this because America responded to 911 as it always responds, not with considered action but with firepower.

     

    Geov Parrish said it as succinctly and as well as anyone. “Any ‘War on Terrorism’ must ultimately be a war of persuasion, not conquest.” It’s such a simple and obvious point. It’s hard to fathom why no one in Washington can get it.

     

    George W. Bush should be impeached and then put on trial for treason.

     

    For Geov Parrish’s article go to: http://dupagepeace.home.att.net/civcas3.html

     

    Israel and Palestine as the Metaphor for the New Pax Americana
    And because the United States believes that conquest not persuasion is the method best suited to our way of doing things, because we believe that with our great technological advances in weaponry we can rule the world, with our overwhelming firepower we can face down the poorest, least equipped nations in the world, we will surely end up just as secure as Israel.

     

     

    It’s as if Israel with all its weaponry–supplied by the USA–and Palestine with rocks and slingshots is a living metaphor for this new War on Terrorism. Maybe we should call these new wars The Missiles/Box Cutter Wars.

     

    Given what we know of the history of the Israel-Palestine conflict, imagine how secure the future of The United States will be if we persist in ignoring Geov Parrish’s advice that “Any ‘War on Terrorism’ must ultimately be a war of persuasion, not conquest.”

     

    What We Could have Done
    What could we have done instead of what we did? We could have shocked the entire world, by (1) withdrawing all of our forces from Saudi Arabia, (2) announcing to Ariel Sharon that he and his government must immediately withdraw from Palestinian occupied territory back to the pre-1967 war boundaries, and (3) load every bomber we have with food and medicine and school supplies and building materials and fly them all to Afghanistan and then begin distributing all that to the beset people of Afghanistan. All this could have been done under the watchful eyes of armed guards supplied by the U.S. military. We got plenty soldiers, you know. We could have begun a massive rebuilding of Afghanistan similar to the Berlin Air Lift after World War II. We could have undone the Taliban and their narrow minded, religiously fanatical idiocies by overwhelming the Afghan people with kindness and good will, and not only would we have done a good thing, we would have fought a battle in The War Against Terrorism like none other. In other words, a war of persuasion not conquest.

     

    Just a couple of decades ago, and in spite of our firepower, a bunch of ill equipped but determined little guys in black pajamas and flip-flops beat us into submission and humiliation in Vietnam because we had no interest in trying to understand what grievances lay behind the conflict in that far away land.

     

    Will we ever learn?


    * * * * *

    UNTITLED

     

    MY REFUSAL OF
    FABRIC-AIDED
    RED
    WHITE
    BLUE

     

    LEAVES ME
    NAKED

     

    NO PROTECTION
    NO IMMUNITY
    NO THING TO HIDE BEHIND

     

    I AM HERE

     

    AND

     

    I AM
    AS
    UNAMERICAN
    AS
    AMERICAN
    CAN BE

     

    Nadine Wolf Budbill
    wordfierce@onebox.com

     

     

    * * * * *GETTING THE NEWS

     

     

    In order to get any kind of honest or real perspective on what has happened since 911 and how the rest of the world feels about it, you must get outside mainstream American news media coverage of the war and it’s aftermath, including NPR’s coverage which has been shamefully timid.

     

    BBC
    Perhaps the most easily accessed foreign broadcasts come from the British Broadcasting Company. In the United States, Public Radio International distributes BBC broadcasts to a number of its affiliates around the States.

     

    For the PRI affiliates that carry the BBC World Service in your area go to: http://www.pri.org/PublicSite/listeners/program.html

     

    The BBC is available on line at: http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/world/default.stm

     

    CBC
    If you live in the northern United States you may be able to get the Canadian Broadcasting Company. Their news program “As It Happens” is a good source of a different perspective on events. “As It Happens”, by the way, was the news show National Public Radio took as its model when NPR set out to create “All Things Considered”.

     

    “As It Happens” is at: http://radio.cbc.ca/programs/asithappens/The CBC in English is available on line at: http://www.cbc.ca/ 
    In French at: http://www.radio-canada.ca/

     

    From Our Friend in Canada
    And from our friend in Canada, Fortner Anderson, comes these additional recommendations. “There’s also zmag.org. Also myafghan.com, or dawn.com a good Pakistani source, and rediff.com for an Indian point-of-view.”

     

    Short Wave
    Short Wave broadcasts in English are another good source of a different perspective. There are numerous ones to choose from. There are English language broadcasts from China, Germany, Czechoslovakia, Belgium and other countries around the world. Get a short wave radio and start looking around. It’s a fun and an ear-opening experience.

     

    The Manchester Guardian
    And, of course, one of the best sources of differing opinion always is the Manchester Guardian which is available at: http://www.guardian.co.uk/

     

    Two Sources Inside the USA
    Here inside the boundaries of The United States we’d like to recommend two sources.

     

    The Anarkiss NewsWire
    Geoffrey Gardner in Sullivan, NH circulates the Anarkiss NewsWire to all who request it. This is NOT a website and to get Gardner’s emailings you need to e-mail him at: anarkiss@mindspring.com.

     

    Once on the list you will get daily mailings. The Anarkiss NewsWire attempts to get around as widely as possible news and commentary, from sources at home and abroad otherwise not readily available, about “The War on Terrorism,” its roots and consequences and its various meanings.

     

    The Anarkiss NewsWire also includes a daily poem touching on questions of war, peace and politics. These poems are floated under the rubric, News That Stays News, following Ezra Pound’s dictum–in the ABC of Reading (1934)–that “Literature is news that STAYS news.” The poems are intended to balance and improve upon the all too real news of each fleeting day.

     

    Toward Freedom
    Toward Freedom : A Progressive Perspective on World Events is a magazine that is dedicated to being “an international news, analysis, and advocacy journal. Toward Freedom seeks to strengthen and extend human justice and liberties in every sphere.”

     

    It’s Advisors and Board Members include: Ossie Davis, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Robin Lloyd, Robert Nichols, Dennis Brutus, Grace Paley, Martin Sheen, and David Dellinger.

     

    Cleanly presented in an 8.5 by 11 format, Toward Freedom ranges widely over both domestic and international issues and is readable, accessible and direct. Very Highly Recommended.

     

    A year’s subscription, eight issues, is $25.00 US ($35.00 international). Send checks to Toward Freedom , P.O. Box 468, Burlington, VT, 05402-0468, USA

     

    More information and articles at: http://www.towardfreedom.com/index.htm

     

    Satire for Survival at Satire Wire/dot.com.edy
    All of us have been inundated with reading material since 911. We need a break. And we need a laugh.

     

    Absolutely the funniest piece we’ve come across in recent weeks is an article called: “Axis of Just as Evil” which is available at:http://www.satirewire.com/news/jan02/axis.shtml

     

    Another good one is “FBI to Issue 5-Day Terror Forecasts: Recognizable Format Should Make It Easier for Americans to Organize Week. Go to:http://www.satirewire.com/news/feb02/forecast.shtml

     

    Another, “Bush Asks Non-U.S. Olympians to Unite Behind America by Finishing Behind America.” Go to:http://www.satirewire.com/news/feb02/olympics.shtml

     

    These and many others are available at Satire Wire / dot.com.edy at: http://www.satirewire.com/index.shtml

     

     

    * * * * *

    WHAT MR. MARLEY SAID

     

    Finally, Dear Reader, we leave you this time with these parting and inspirational words from a certain Mr. Marley who knew, far better than most of us, whereof he spoke:

     

     

    Get up, stand up, stand up for your rights.
    Get up, stand up, stand up for your rights.
    Get up, stand up, stand up for your rights.
    Get up, stand up, don’t give up the fight!
     

    You can fool some people sometimes,
    But you can’t fool all the people all the time.
    So now we see the light.
    We gonna stand up for our rights!
     

    Oh, you better: Get up, stand up, stand up for your rights.
    Get up, stand up, stand up for your rights.
    Get up, stand up, stand up for your rights.
    Get up, stand up, don’t give up the fight!

    Read More...

    SEPTEMBER 11th AND AFTER:
    GETTING OUTSIDE OURSELVES

    * * * * *
    SPECIAL NOTE FROM THE EDITOR: This issue of the JME was put together before the bombing of Afghanistan began at midday on Sunday, October 7th. All the pleas here for caution and restraint seem more important now, not less.

    In This Issue:

     

    • David’s Notes:
    • Reports from Dublin, Ireland, and Geneva, Switzerland
    • We Are Not the Only People on the Earth by Steve Nelson
    • Reports from Bern, Switzerland, and Washington, DC
    • Our Hubris Overflows by Donald M. Reid
    • Reports from San Francisco, California, and Burlington, Vermont
    • Suggestions for Further Reading
    • An End to the Age of Impunity by David Budbill

    * * * * *
    DAVID’S NOTES:

    One correspondent to THE JUDEVINE MOUNTAIN EMAILITE tells this story:

    “I met a person who said to me on the day of the bombing, ‘My God, this is probably the worst thing to happen to civilians in history. I just can’t think of anything this terrible happening in the past.’ I calmly reminded her of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the Holocaust. ‘Oh of course,’ she continued, ‘I meant in the United States.’ As a country we are so self-involved. It is always about us.”

    This issue of THE JUDEVINE MOUNTAIN EMAILITE is dedicated to trying to see the tragedy of September 11th from outside “us” and to thinking about how we might avoid the mistakes that violent and massive retaliation will surely involve.

    Again and again in the essays and responses here, people call for restraint, caution, reason, calm, meekness, humility. These, I think, are not just ideas growing out of a religious and moral sense, although they are that. They are ideas that grow out of an ever growing sense that such an approach is practical, it is, given the circumstances, just good old All American pragmatism. As someone said to me at an art opening a few nights ago, “It’s the only thing left that will work.” If we respond to this attack in our usual way with all our technology and firepower, everyone seems to be saying, WE WILL SURELY FAIL just as we failed in Vietnam and Baghdad, to cite just two examples.

    These calls for restraint, caution, reason, calm, meekness and humility have been made all the more necessary by our teenage, cowboy President and his use of language: “smoke ‘em out of their holes”–“wanted dead or alive.”

    And speaking of the use of language, the government could use a few more poets in their employ. Whoever the slogan maker is who changed the name from Infinite Justice to Enduring Freedom obviously didn’t know anything about the other meaning of the word endure, and I fear that is just what the rest of the world will have to do now even more than they’ve had to do it in the past–ENDURE America’s notion of freedom.

    We don’t plan to reproduce here the articles and letters that have been circulating widely on the internet. Instead, we will append toward the end of this JME a list of recommended reading and how you can get to it.

    We would however like to strongly and especially recommend one particular article which we feel lays the situation open like none other. It is Arundhati Roy’s “The Algebra of Infinite Justice” which appeared on 29 September in THE MANCHESTER GUARDIAN, Manchester, England. Here is the link to the article: http://www.guardian.co.uk/Archive/Article/0,4273,4266289,00.htm

    What we propose to do here with JME #23 is offer comments from people you almost certainly have not heard from, plus a couple of essays, one from a newspaper not widely circulated, the other from a middle eastern scholar. We also have reports, exclusive to the JME, from correspondents in Dublin, Ireland, Geneva and Bern, Switzerland, and from places around the United States. My own essay AN END TO THE AGE OF IMPUNITY, which I wrote two days after the bombing, brings up the rear.

    Finally, a heart felt plea to put away the American flags, that symbol of our nationalism, and raise instead the flag of suffering humanity. Let us attend to the pain and grief of suffering humanity–no matter where it presents itself to us, whether it is the stock broker who died in the rubble of the WTC or the janitor in the stock broker’s office, or the fireman who died trying to save them both, or the suffering and starving people of Afghanistan now fleeing in panic and fear.

    No amount of revenge and retribution can do anything to assuage anybody’s pain. Revenge and retribution make only more suffering. Buddha was right. “Life is suffering.” And only our compassion, our boundless compassion, can begin to ease the pain.

    * * * * *

     

    from Dublin, Ireland
    HOW LONG WILL IT TAKE?

    On the “Day of Remembrance”, Ireland shut down for the day: shops were closed, offices were closed. Pubs were closed! The crowds at the American Embassy were so intense that people stood for hours to sign the condolence book. When my bus passed the Embassy a week after the bombing, the sidewalk for a block in each direction was still covered with notes and bouquets of flowers. The sense of solidarity and shared grief here is extremely moving.

    How long will it take for W. to dissipate this and fill the sidewalks outside the Embassy with protesters instead?

    David French

     

    * * * * *
     

    from Geneva, Switzerland
    THEY THINK THEMSELVES KING OF THE WORLD

    We heard of it in the afternoon, and immediately saw the frightening pictures… Nobody could believe what they saw and listened to. (many people said afterwards that they thought of a movie, expecting the hero to come and save the poor guys on the 90th floor…) It took a long time to sort of realize what was happening and start considering the consequences. I personally stood on the phone with my best friends for hours, and went to bed pretty late. Nothing had the same meaning or importance. I started to think of the people I know around New York. We were watching the confusion and all those who were stuck in airports, stations. However, towards the US, the rumor quickly rose: “They have what they deserve. They think themselves the king of the world, they show their pride and patriotism, play with their wealth and power; too bad it’s innocents who are paying for them, but…”

    Rosalie Kung

    rosykung@hotmail.com

    * * * * *
    WE ARE NOT THE ONLY PEOPLE ON THE EARTH

     

    A wounded New York City is swathed in red, white and blue. A neighbor cried as he described the corridor of flags through which his fire-fighter friend traveled to interment. Many cars display Old Glory from windows or antennas, most apartment buildings and stores fly the flag, and delivery boys on fat-tired bicycles wear Stars and Stripes headbands. The President has declared war and the nation has risen behind him with a tearful chorus of God Bless America. “We are the greatest people on Earth” proclaimed a handout from a local church.

     

    From the emotional rubble of the World Trade Center attack a Phoenix of national pride has risen. I drove back to New York from Vermont last Sunday evening and, with very mixed emotions, discovered an American flag hanging from the awning of my apartment building. For many the flag display is a statement of consolation, sorrow, unity in a time of crisis, and profound admiration for the courage of firefighters and volunteers. I feel each of those. But flags are also hung in anger, serving as fierce demands for revenge and frightening signs that American righteousness will further fracture the world community.

     

    In Strafford, VT a junk car carries the message “Nuke ‘em, Geo.” In Cleveland, Ohio a man drove his Ford Mustang through the doors of an Islamic Center. In Arizona and Texas dark-skinned men in turbans were murdered. In six other states mosques have been attacked. Around the country Arab Americans have been taunted, attacked and humiliated. We have enthusiastically given the president a free hand to hunt down the terrorists and severely punish those who are even distantly complicit. He uses the language of war to inflame public sentiment and invokes the spirit of Wild West vigilante justice by saying he wants Osama bin Laden “Dead or Alive.” The president and his advisors now claim to be absolutely certain about the identity and guilt of the terrorists, exuding an odd confidence from a government that had nary a whiff of an attack that was years in the making.

     

    Our national pride is boundless and respects no boundaries. Even our tragedies must be the biggest and the best. Just weeks ago most Americans were comfortable in the myth that we were the leaders of a world at peace. We were entertained nightly by yet another riveting tale of a politician and an intern or reality shows contrived to provide a little zest to go with our consumption. The rest of the world saw war in Macedonia, fighting in Zimbabwe, and Protestant missile attacks on Catholic schoolgirls in Northern Ireland. Several weeks ago a Palestinian suicide bomber left his decapitated body in the street as his head flew into a Jerusalem playground for Jewish schoolchildren to discover.

     

    Larry King never talks to the victims of ongoing bombings in Iraq. When a pharmaceutical factory in Sudan was mistakenly bombed in 1998, Fox Television did not carry human-interest stories about the diseases that filled the howling hole in vaccination supplies. When NATO bombed civilian targets in Kosovo, including hospitals, CNN did not cover the volunteers who brought pie to those courageous rescue workers. Until Tuesday, the disinfected products of global violence were packaged in neat 30-second segments on the evening news. Now America has been bloodied and our appetite for grief and outrage is insatiable.

     

    For now we are awash in sympathy and support from most of the world community. For now they mourn our thousands of missing and dead. But they will eventually ask why we don’t grieve the 500,000 Iraqi children whose lives have been destroyed in part because of our policies, including the intentional destruction of their supply of safe water. The Arab nations that console us today will soon again wonder why we did not similarly cherish the 17,500 civilians who died in the Israeli invasion of Lebanon. Too many Muslims will remember family members killed, burned, and maimed by American-made weapons.

     

    We were conspicuous in our absence from the recent World Conference Against Racism, where thousands of delegates struggled mightily to reach out across centuries of hostility, and wide gaps in language, religious belief, and culture. We have abandoned international treaties because they don’t serve our selfish security interests and we have ignored the world consensus on environmental issues because it doesn’t serve our economy. Congress immediately appropriated $40 billion for vengeance but will not release $2.3 billion in back dues to the United Nations. Our priorities are clear to everyone but us.

     

    Nothing justifies the unspeakable acts of September 11. In my neighborhood the local fire department lost seven men. My stomach still aches every day when I look toward downtown with fresh horror at what has been done to my city, to my country. The terrorists are not cowards – they are worse. They are vicious, dogma-addled fanatics who are a threat to the world. Like every civilized person on Earth, I hope the terrorists are brought to justice – civilized justice.

     

    But I also wish that for every dollar appropriated to bring terrorists to justice we would appropriate a dollar for peace. I wish that for every incursion into the Middle East seeking revenge that we would send a mission into the Middle East to alleviate suffering. I wish that for every gesture of support from Arab nations during this crisis we will lift a sanction, offer economic and humanitarian aid, and establish comprehensive cultural and educational exchanges. I wish that for every American flag raised in sorrow or anger there will be a peace flag flown in hope. We are not “the greatest people on Earth.” We are not the only people on Earth.

     

    Every now and then last week the wind came from lower Manhattan and buffeted the flag on my building with hints of acrid smoke from the smoldering remains of the World Trade Center. We must be restrained. There has been death enough.

     

    Steve Nelson

    Steve.Nelson@calhoun.org

     

    EDITOR’S NOTE: Steve Nelson lives in Vermont and New York City. This article first appeared in THE VALLEY NEWS, Lebanon, New Hampshire.

     

     

     

    * * * * *from Bern, Switzerland
    THE STATUE OF NEBUCHADNEZAR
     

    Do you know what came to me when I saw the towers of the WTC collapse? A picture from the old Bible: the collapse of the statue of Nebuchadnezar. There it states (Daniel 2:35): “the whole tower of gold and silver and iron and brick collapsed and became dust!” Bigshot’s dreams become dust. We in Europe too are guilty — we have no excuse. The speech of President Bush also makes us anxious. Our only hope is that it’s just words, and that ruinous acts don’t arise from them.

     

    Theo Bruggemann

     

    theobrueggemann@bluewin.ch

    * * * * *
    from Washington, DC, to Brooklyn:
    A GRANDMOTHER’S CALL

    I finally got in touch with Sarah this morning – – just doing the same thing as always, hitting the redial button, trying not to listen to the mechanical lady intoning “I’m sorry…” — and the phone rang, then rang again, then again — and the answering machine came on. I just kept talking and talking until Sarah woke up and picked up — we then stayed on the line for over an hour, each of us reluctant to hang up, since we knew we might not talk again for an indefinite length of time.

    They are as well as can be expected. On Tuesday, Sarah took Lucas and Eliot to the park; all the adults there were listening to Walkmen with stricken expressions on their faces, while the kids played gaily in the smokey air.

    The brother of a friend of theirs is a firefighter — he’s ok, but has been pulling 12 hour shifts, and when he comes home he just sits in a chair and holds the new baby, and watches the television scenes of the places he has just been and to which he will have to return in a matter of hours.

    I saw Brooklyn’s Seventh Avenue on the news last night in connection with the loss of most of the Park Slope Fire Company. It was eerie to see the familiar neighborhood, looking normal, as they panned the streets and settled on the boy scout troop who had had a close relationship with the fire company. And I remember the guys, always there, doors open, next to the Coop, talking to Lucas and letting him see the engines. Sarah isn’t taking him to the Coop for a while, since flowers and teddy bears and notes are banked against the closed door. When Andrew told Lucas about the “accident” he said the police and the firefighters were working hard to make things as safe as they could be. Now the firefighters are gone. Hard to know what to tell a little boy to be as reassuring as you can without lying to him about his putative safety.

    Katherine J. Williams

    katherine.j.williams@gte.net


    * * * * *
    from Atlanta, Georgia
    OUR HUBRIS OVERFLOWS

    As a professor who has studied and taught about the Middle East for more than thirty years, I fear that in response to the catastrophe of September 11 we are about to strike out in blind anger and self-righteousness. If we allow ourselves to be provoked into military action in Afghanistan that leads to the death and dispossession of large numbers of civilians, we will be playing straight into the hands of those who planned and carried out the terrible crime of Sept. 11. Already before our military strikes, tens of thousands–perhaps hundreds of thousands–of refugees in that war-torn land are fleeing their homes in panic. We do not hear their cries, but we can be sure that children there are already dying because of our actions.

    As we mourn our tragedy of September 11, the appropriate response is not war, the rhetoric of which our politicians and the mainstream media have so assiduously stoked. Instead we should relentlessly pursue the organizations and surviving individuals who plotted this deed. This is a crime against humanity, and they must be brought to justice for it before U.S or international courts.

    Our outrage at this atrocity should not blind us to long-standing injustices of U.S. policies in the Middle East, which fuel the hatred and despair from which this deed sprang. Islam, Christianity, and Judaism–like all religions–have their unreachable extremists, but attention to justified grievances produced by our Middle East policies would go a long way toward draining the growing pool of those willing to perpetrate or cheer such deeds.

    We should continue to support vigorously the human and national rights of Israelis to live in peace and security within their country’s pre-1967 borders. We have failed, however, to take equally seriously the identical human and national rights of the Palestinians to live in peace and security in a state of their own. Massive, uncritical US support for Israel has encouraged the rise to power there of right-wing extremists who endlessly push settlements in illegally occupied territories, denying the basic rights of Palestinians and labeling a whole people “terrorists.” Israelis and Palestinians both live in fear today, but one must not lose sight of the fact that one is the occupier with (U.S-supplied) tanks and planes and the other the occupied, lightly-armed but for the courage of despair.

    Iraq suffers under the double tragedy of the brutal dictatorship of Saddam Hussein and the effects of the U.S.-dominated embargo and bombings. Since the end of the Gulf War, well over half a million civilians, most of them children, have died from disease and malnutrition as a result of the embargo. We blame Saddam Hussein and wash our hands of the matter, our mainstream press hardly covering the on-going tragedy. But the moral responsibility is ours as well.

    The original name for the Bush administration’s newly-declared “war on terrorism” was “Operation Infinite Justice.” Our hubris overflows. Surely we should have not had to let our Muslim friends and allies remind us that infinity is a human longing, not a human attribute, and that in Christianity, Islam, and Judaism infinite justice comes from God alone.

    Donald M. Reid

    dreid@gsu.edu

    EDITOR’S NOTE: Donald M. Reid is a professor of Middle Eastern History at Georgia State University in Atlanta. Forty years ago, Don and The Editor of THE JUDEVINE MOUNTAIN EMAILITE were the creators and editors of an underground literary and political magazine called THE ANGRY I. top

    * * * * *
    from Burlintgon, Vermont
    BLESSED ARE THE MEEK

    Matthew 5:4: “Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth.”

    More and more I see that a violent response to this is not the answer. I was fantasizing about what would/could happen if President Bush apologized to the Middle Eastern people who feel that we violated their holy ground ten years ago. That’s supposedly what a lot of this is about. It may not help, but it would definitely be an unexpected and HUMBLE response. Humility looks meek, but as you know, it is a powerful weapon against anger.

    P. Wood

    * * * * *
    from San Francisco, California
    EXASPERATED

    I am exasperated by the American belief that every adversity can be conquered by mounting a horse and going out to kick some butt, followed by riding happily off into the sunset. This approach has had disastrous results in the “war on drugs” and is liable to have equally disastrous results in a “war on terrorism.” If we are unwilling to address the more sophisticated and complex issues that lead to the problem in the first place, we’ll just continue to beat helplessly at the air.

    Linda Young

    linda_k_young@onebox.com


    * * * * *
    SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER READING

     

    EDITOR’S NOTE: Since September 11th we have received or sent more than 1100 emails, we’ve read hundreds of letters, essays and commentaries. There is an endless amount of reading material out there on the web. What follows here is a tiny selection of the things we’ve read that we recommend.

     

    ** For insight into what it is like to live with terrorism every day read the diaries of a Palestinian woman named Reema and her 18 year old sister, Fida. To get these diaries contact Jules Rabin at: jhrabin@sover.net

     

    ** An excellent article published on 13 September in THE MANCHESTER GUARDIAN, is Seumas Milne’s, “They Can’t See Why They are Hated” by Seumas Milne. Double click on: http://www.guardian.co.uk/Archive/Article/0,4273,4255855,00.html

     

    ** Another excellent and extended article in THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR for 27 September by Peter Ford is called WHY DO THEY HATE US? It’s available at: http://www.csmonitor.com/2001/0927/p1s1-wogi.html

     

    ** To read Sharif Abdullah’s moving essay OUR WAR WITH “THE OTHER,” contact Anna Nuse at: anuse@hotmail.com

     

    ** Suheir Hammad is a Palestinian American writer from New York City and the author of BORN PALESTINIAN, BORN BLACK, and other books. To read her poem, “First Writing Since” contact Anna Nuse at: anuse@hotmail.com

     

    ** To read W.H. Auden’s poem “September 1, 1939″ go to: http://www.gametec.com/poemdujour/Sept1.1939.html

     

    ** For a campy presentation of the widely circulated essay “Bomb them with Butter, Bribe them with Hope” go to:http://www.geocities.com/sanfrancisco_mermaid/NO_WAR/BOMB-THEM-WITH-BUTTER.HTML

     

    ** For the nadir of hate journalism go to the back page editorial in TIME MAGAZINE, for 11 September 2001, the one with the exploding WTC towers on the cover, and read “The Case for Rage and Retribution” by Lance Morrow.

     

    ** Eve Ensler is the author of “The Vagina Monologues”. To read her essay, I HAVE BEEN THINKING, go to: http://www.vday.org/ie/index.cfm?articleID=544

     


    * * * * *
    from Wolcott, Vermont
    AN END TO THE AGE OF IMPUNITY

     

    The most striking image for me in all the hours of television I watched on September 11th was the picture of a man and a woman, both African Americans, both dressed in business suits, both completely covered in gray ash, both fleeing hand in hand, their mouths open in gasping Os. Their ashen faces and bodies, their postures of woundedness, grief and confusion made me think of images I’ve seen of people in Hiroshima and Nagasaki in the moments and days after we dropped atomic bombs on those cities.

     

    A lot of people have been saying the American age of innocence is over. To cite just one example, shortly after 1:30 in the afternoon on Sunday, September 16th, Mara Liasson on National Public Radio said, “A certain amount of our innocence is gone.” She gave voice to a common misunderstanding. We as a nation have never been innocent. What is over is not our innocence. What is over is the American age of impunity. Now the jealousy, hatred, envy and resentment that we have generated for ourselves around the world comes home to visit us, now we get to suffer as the rest of the world has suffered.

     

    Seeing those two people staggering through the rubble of the World Trade Center and thinking about Hiroshima and Nagasaki, made me think about the saturation bombing and the napalm we loosed on Vietnam and that made me think about the TV pictures of our relentless bombing of Baghdad, you remember those squeaky clean images of our “smart” bombs falling all over Baghdad, you remember how we sat at home and watched on our TVs as Generals Powell and Schwartzkoff explained to us the technical details of our devastation of Iraq.

     

    What unites all of these images of human suffering, these acts of carnage and devastation, from Nagasaki to Baghdad, until September 11th, is how all of them were so far away, just pictures to us, just TV images to be analyzed and watched with a cool and pristine fascination.

     

    Not anymore.

     

    My daughter stood on the Brooklyn shore of the East River and watched tens of thousands of ash covered New Yorkers stream across the Brooklyn Bridge as if they were refugees, this timeless image from Germany, Japan, Vietnam, China, Iraq, Bosnia, Ethiopia, Rwanda, this image of dazed and confused refugees fleeing–this image come home now to New York.

     

    No amount of macho, saber-rattling, bravado out of the mouths of politicians and generals can save us from the images of September 11th. Now we know what it’s like to have done to us what we do to others.

     

    Let us pause a moment.

     

    Let us ponder what unleashing yet another wave of violence will do to create yet another generation of people who hate us and vow revenge upon us.

     

    Let us ponder what unleashing yet another wave of violence will do to continue this international curse of war on civilians.

     

    Let us act now to stop the carnage rather than perpetuate it.

     

    David Budbill

     


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    COMING SOON: in the JME #24: September 11th and After and Issues of Race in America
    Updated: 10/2/2011

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    ANOTHER ISSUE ON RACE IN AMERICA
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    In This Issue:

     

  • David’s Notes: 
  • Opening the Colonial Eye: A Talk Given in Celebration of John Brown’s Birthday, by Lois Eby 
  • A Tribute to Paul Laurence Dunbar, by David Budbill
  •  

     

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    DAVID’S NOTES:

     

    This issue of The Judevine Mountain Emailite continues JME’s interest in how Black and white Americans relate, or don’t relate. For more essays on race in America see back issues of JME numbers 1918171363and 2.

    On May 5th, painter, essayist and commentator for Vermont Public Radio, Lois Eby, traveled to the John Brown Farm in Lake Placid, New York–a State Historic Site, where John Brown and others who died in the raid on Harper’s Ferry are buried–to celebrate John Brown’s Birthday which is May 9th. The lead essay in this issue of The JME is the talk Lois Eby delivered at that celebration.

    Following Lois Eby’s essay is The Editor’s short tribute to Paul Laurence Dunbar.

    The Editor cannot finish these notes however without mentioning again, since it seems so many people have already forgotten, that this last Presidential election was not an election but a theft, pulled off by a handful of powerful people, lead by Thief Justice William Rehnquist in an effort to maintain the Good Old Boy White Male Hegemony. Yet within this depressing and nearly hopeless situation has appeared a glimmer of light.

    When a nascent oligarchy can usurp the will of the people by conspiring to steal an election and then, after it is in office, have the audacity to behave like a junta and operate as if it were a dictatorship, it takes someone with real moral courage to confront such a raw usurpation of power, to stand up, step forward and fire the first shot in the revolution.

    On May 24, Jim Jeffords, our shy and retiring Senator from right here in Vermont, did just such a thing. Let us hope this is only the opening salvo in a firefight that will continue now and intensify until George Bush, William Rehnquist, Dick Cheney and their cronies understand that the United States of America is more than an investment opportunity for their capitalistic, free enterprise, supply side pals bent on amassing even more personal wealth and power than they already have.

    (for more on William Rehnquist see: “Just Our Bill: A Bit of the Rehnquist Past” by Dennis Roddy, in JME #21)

     

     

     

    * * * * * 

     

    Opening the Colonial Eye
    A Talk given in Celebration of John Brown’s Birthday
    by
    Lois Eby

    A few weeks ago I heard a young African American woman speak about a project she had been involved in with girls who are streetchildren in Haiti. In order to explain the large numbers of street children and the desperate situation in which they live, she provided a bit of the history of Haiti. After a 13 year revolt, in 1804 the enslaved Africans in Haiti won their freedom from the French colonialists. They won their freedom, but the devastating war, the ongoing struggle among Haitians for power and control, and an ongoing variety of self-interested actions by the colonial powers, including the United States, reduced the country to dire poverty where it still is today, exploited or ignored by some of its own but certainly by the international community.

    Frelime Bell-Hempstead, the young African American I heard speak, used the term “the colonial eye” to speak of the way European and American whites view those of African descent and of how this view affects the life of the streetgirls, who are subject to hunger, rape and prostitution. This “colonial eye” as you well know, projects its own sexual and violent fantasies and realities onto people of African descent. In order to justify exploitation, it sees them as inferior and therefore as deserving of less. This colonial eye convinces itself by what it sees and what it doesn’t see that these less-than-equal beings deserved to be enslaved and now deserve the poverty and exploitation in which they live.

    Being a painter, any mention of how the eye sees catches my attention. I am very aware that what people bring to a painting affects what they see there. In art that is okay with me; I accept the creative dialogue between the work and its viewers; but Frelime’s story of the Haitian children and their country’s history is a story of seeing that is not okay. It’s a heartbreaking story, one that once again, as so much of the history of the “colonial eye” does, casts me into a feeling of dismay and hopelessness.

    I come to this talk, having listened to Frelime Bell-Hempstead, asking myself, and you, how people move from the “colonial eye” to a larger vision? Jean-Bertrand Aristide has a small book called “Eyes of the Heart.” It is with these eyes, the eyes of the heart, that we must see and with which we must open the “colonial eye.” While thinking of how to open this eye, I looked up John Brown on the Internet and came across a powerful speech about him that Frederick Douglas delivered in May of 1881. In this address, Douglas asks the question, how did John Brown become so committed to the abolition of slavery? in other words, what opened John Brown’s eyes?

    Suggesting an answer to this question might be found in the following story about John Brown, Douglas wrote:

    “An incident of his boyhood may explain, in some measure, the intense abhorrence he felt to slavery. He had for some reason been sent into the State of Kentucky, where he made the acquaintance of a slave boy, about his own age, of whom he became very fond. For some petty offense this boy was one day subjected to a brutal beating. The blows were dealt with an iron shovel and fell fast and furiously upon his slender body. Born in a free state and unaccustomed to such, Brown revolted at the shocking spectacle and at that early age he swore eternal hatred to slavery. After years never obliterated the impression, and he found in this early experience an argument against contempt for small things.”

    One could say that John Brown’s eyes opened; he began to see with heart. In my own experience it was a white woman from Glens Falls, New York, who began the process of opening my eyes. I was a student and she was the Director of Religious Activities at Duke University in the early 60’s when the sit ins began. I had been raised in Oklahoma and I had never questioned the racial divisions of our society. Barbara Benedict Bunker raised the issue with me and encouraged me to join the picket line at a movie theater in Durham. I was afraid. But Barbara kept after me, I could not find any just reason not to become involved, and eventually I joined the picket lines.

    Joining the picket lines meant not only going to protest demonstrations; it also meant going to organizing meetings and trainings in nonviolence where I had the opportunity to know black people as equals, an opportunity I had not had as a child. I remember clearly to this day going to a meeting in Durham in an African American home and meeting there the Editor and Publisher of the African American newspaper in the city where I grew up. He and I looked at each other, I with great confusion and shame, for I knew that back home I would never have had the opportunity to meet this man as I did that night. Eventually a couple of us Duke students wanted to bring some of our new friends from an all Black college in Durham to a lunch meeting at Duke, only to learn that we were not allowed to bring Black guests to lunch at our great university.

    Having gotten to know African Americans, much as John Brown did, my own understanding, anger, and heartbreak at their treatment deepened. In addition, I began to understand what it means to say that when another group’s rights are diminished, your own rights are diminished also. I was not free to go where I pleased or eat with whom I pleased, as long as African Americans were not free as well.

    Thus I became committed to the civil rights movement, not as a great hero like John Brown, I hasten to add. As Frederick Douglas points out in praising Brown, few of us, Black or white, have the makings of such a hero, one who is willing to give his life for others. But in my own small and quiet way I changed. Then in a few years I had another opportunity which further opened my eyes. My husband and I were hired in the fall of 1967 to teach at Lincoln University, an almost all Black university in southeastern Pennsylvania. I was hired to teach in a pilot project to replace Freshman English with a Humanities course. Unbelievable as it may seem today, in this Black college Freshman English had consisted entirely of the literature of the white Western heritage. It was the task of the new Humanities course to create a curriculum which would include literature and art of the entire world, including African and African American literature and art.

    There was only one problem. The three of us hired to create this course were white. We ourselves had never read these books or been taught this art and literature. While I now understand the injustice and irony of our being the ones to make this change, this was the most exciting learning of my life. I entered a new world of life experience and the literature and art created to express it. It was as if I had been living in a small, dark room only to have the doors and windows thrown open and fresh air and light allowed to rush in. I couldn’t believe that this literature and art had not been a part of my education, let alone of the education of the Black students in my classes. The great artists and writers of the African and African American tradition expressed love of humanity and love of freedom in ways that sang in my white heart.

    While progress has been made in many areas of our national life, and in our national attitudes, from Freshman English to World Humanities for example, in many essential ways we are still very much living in the past and viewing the world with our colonial eye. Thus the two races can see events in quite different ways. Frederick Douglas speaks about the way whites saw John Brown’s raid on a sleeping hamlet as an inexplicable act of terrorism against innocent people. John Brown on the other hand saw that a white community which imprisoned Africans as slaves, holding them as captives against their will, was engaged in an act of war whether they called it so or not, and should expect acts of war against themselves. They were not entirely innocent sleeping people. This different perception is still with us. We have only to look at white fear of Black drug use for one example. Recent U.S. government-sponsored studies, quoted in Vermont’s Times-Argus, show that white high school seniors use cocaine, crack and heroin at much higher rates than their black peers and that white teen-agers are about a third more likely to have sold drugs. Yet, it is the Black youth who are in prison in unprecedented numbers. This question of how to open the colonial eye is as urgent as it ever was.

    So I come back to my question, how can we change from the colonial eye to the eye with vision? This new vision can only come about through the efforts of those both white and Black who find some way to use their talents to work for justice AND to work to enlarge the white community’s knowledge of the riches of the African American heritage. We still need the courage and dedication of a John Brown, the persistence of a Barbara Benedict Bunker. John Brown was a white person who took the task of a different white vision seriously, gave his life for it, and helped to rouse a nation to fight the civil war which abolished slavery. My mentor is another example. She was committed and she hung in there until she got me to be committed. On one level it is not the problem of Black people whether white people shed their colonial eye. We whites are certainly most responsible to work with our own. On the other hand, the colonial eye has done immeasurable damage to Africans and African Americans and continues to do so. So it must matter to all of us to think about how to educate that eye, change it, enlarge its vision.

    Ever since the two years I spent at Lincoln University, my engagement in civil rights issues has been immeasurably enriched by my encounter with African American art and literature. Black intellectual Alair Leroy Locke, author of The New Negro, which was published in 1925, is called by some the Father of the Harlem Renaissance. Locke wrote, “Art must discover and reveal the beauty which prejudice and caricature have overlaid.” Here we find a black intellectual addressing this very problem of the colonial eye and suggesting that Black artists can play a role in correcting and enlarging the image of their people, mostly I’m sure for the sake of Black people themselves, but I would hope also to address what white people fail to see. At the same time Locke was encouraging the arts, W. E. B. DuBois had begun publication of Crisis, a journal of the NAACP. I see these two men, promoting two important directions in the 1920’s, as setting directions that still are critical to us today.

    So in closing I’d like to talk about the African American artist, John Biggers. I did not learn about John Biggers until about four years ago when a white student from Houston, TX, where he lived, told me about him. Then I went to see a show of his work at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. This was a third eye-opening experience of realizing how much I had been deprived because of the separation of the races and the lack of valuing of Black artists in our mainstream culture. How could I not have known about this great artist?

    John Biggers died this winter, on January 28, 2001, at age 76. His death is an important event in the world of art, and one that should be widely publicized. He is an artist who combines the history of his people in Africa with their history in the American South, their experience of nature, family and spirituality, in ways that are both grounded and transcendent. He speaks to us all about human communities and their relationship to nature and to each other. The Director of the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, Peter C. Marzio, says of Biggers in his Foreword to the book The Art of John Biggers: View from the Upper Room:

    “John Biggers . . . leads us with his powerful imagery, his impassioned discourse, his intense energy, and his all-consuming belief in the human community and its mystical interaction with the natural world . . . Our current vocabulary does not help us to understand fully John Biggers’s profound significance to the world today. Words in our everyday idiom such as “multicultural” and “ecology” touch the edges of his vision, but they do not tell us much about the man himself. He is a stout defender of human equality and the preservation of nature, as his art so clearly demonstrates, and his paintings teem with images that reflect his beliefs . . . . They almost demand a fourth dimension to let us experience everything that is in the artist’s heart and mind.”

    When we have been raised to see with the “colonial eye” we never lose it completely. It lurks there in the recesses of the mind. One can only hope to become ever more aware of it, to nurture friendships, work for civil rights, search out the truth in our social issues, and increase knowledge of the arts across the races that will create a larger, more visionary Ôeye of the heart’ that slowly drowns out that small and strangling inheritance. Recently I ended a talk on art to a group of both white and Black students with some slides of John Biggers’ work. I thought as I did so that while many white people expect Black people to appreciate white Western culture with its white subjects, its white men and women, in art and literature, these same white people might have a hard time seeing themselves in Black art and literature and tend to view it as Black, and for African Americans, but not for them. It is this kind of seeing that makes us small. Yet I also thought to myself that John Biggers’ vision is large indeed: it is a vision of humanity in harmony with nature and spiritual values that our society desperately needs.

    I join you today in honoring John Brown and ask you to join me in honoring John Biggers, both men of vision who offer a way into the future. It is only 136 years since the Civil War ended. The work to build a society for all the immigrants to the new world from all the continents is still much ahead of us. In the meantime, while we are asking how to open the colonial eye, so destructive and so much still with us, the courage and vision of John Brown show us the commitment we need to equality and justice for all, and the paintings of John Biggers offer us a vision, an eye of the heart, and that’s as good a place to start, and end, as any I know.

    ———-

    LOIS EBY can be reached at: leby@sover.net. The John Brown birthday celebration was sponsored by JOHN BROWN LIVES! A Grassroots Freedom Education and Human Rights Project: more at:http://www.iath.virginia.edu/jbrown/master.html

     

     

    * * * * *
     

    A Tribute to Paul Laurence Dunbar
    by
    David Budbill

     

     

    [Note: This essay first appeared as a commentary on NPR’s Weekend All Things Considered on June 23, 2001. If you would rather listen to this essay, the soundfile is available at:http://www.npr.org/ramfiles/watc/20010623.watc.06.rmm]

     

    It seems like almost everybody in the world knows that Maya Angelou wrote a book called I KNOW WHY THE CAGED BIRD SINGS, and it’s a wonderful book. What’s not so wonderful is almost everybody in the world also thinks Maya Angelou wrote the title. She did not, she knows she didn’t, but almost everybody else thinks she did.

     

    Paul Laurence Dunbar wrote that line. It’s a line from his poem called “Sympathy” and it’s time to give credit where credit is due.

    Paul Laurence Dunbar was born in Dayton, Ohio, in 1872. He died of tuberculosis back in Dayton in 1906 at the age of 33. In his short life he became internationally famous for his poems.

    However, and here’s the rub, Dunbar wrote two distinctly different kinds of poems. He wrote poems in what was then considered the Negro dialect, poems in which Dunbar reproduced the pronunciations and rhythms of the everyday speech of ordinary black Americans. He also wrote elegant poems in standard Victorian English the equal of any white Victorian poet. But it was the dialect poems for which Dunbar became famous, because white America did not want to acknowledge that a black man could write poetry in what white people considered standard English.

    Dunbar was frustrated by this, for he considered his poems in standard English far superior to his dialect poems. As his fame increased because of the dialect poems he turned more and more to fiction to speak bluntly and forcefully about the injustices heaped upon blacks in America, but white America was not listening.

    Toward the end of his life he grew increasingly bitter about the cage white America had put him in. It is in this context that one should read his poem “Sympathy,” for surely the bird in this cage is Paul Laurence Dunbar himself.

     

    SYMPATHY 

    I know what the caged bird feels, alas!
    When the sun is bright on the upland slopes;
    When the wind stirs soft through the springing grass
    And the river flows like a stream of glass;
    When the first bird sings and the first bud opes,
    And the faint perfume from its chalice steals–
    I know what the caged bird feels!

    I know why the caged bird beats his wing
    Till its blood is red on the cruel bars;
    For he must fly back to his perch and cling
    When he fain would be on the bough a-swing;
    And a pain still throbs in the old, old scars
    And they pulse again with a keener sting–
    I know why he beats his wing!

    I know why the caged bird sings, ah me,
    When his wing is bruised and his bosom sore,
    When he beats his bars and would be free;
    It is not a carol of joy or glee,
    But a prayer that he sends from his heart’s deep core
    But a plea, that upward to Heaven he flings–
    I know why the caged bird sings!

     

     

     

    * * * * *
    COMING SOON: in JME #23: CROSSING THE BORDER: A Sunday Drive in the Country to See the View from the Heights of White Privilege

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